Chapel of St Mary Magdalene

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About Chapel of St Mary Magdalene

The earliest documented evidence of a church in the vicinity of Dingli Cliffs dates back to the 15th century. By the mid-16th century, the name of the surrounding area became synonymous with the...

The earliest documented evidence of a church in the vicinity of Dingli Cliffs dates back to the 15th century. By the mid-16th century, the name of the surrounding area became synonymous with the name of this church dedicated to St. Mary Magdalene. From the reports made by Inquisitor Dusina in 1575, it is known that the church was then barely standing and almost in ruins. Nevertheless, liturgical services were still held on the feast day of St. Mary Magdalene. 

An inscription above the door records that the church had been restored during the time of Bishop Balguer, and opened again for public worship, in 1646.

The church is small, as is typical of such countryside churches, consisting of a simple one-cell-formation. Its small parvis is raised onto high ground. Above the door, a circular window provides the interior of the church with adequate sunlight when the church door is closed. On the facade of the church and next to the door, there is a small marble tablet with an Italian inscription that says, "Non gode l'immunita ecclesias". This inscription warned all those who were in trouble with the law that the church's precincts were not available as an ecclesiastical protection against the state authorities.

In recent times, the church underwent structural restoration, and a new altarpiece replaced the older one.  The new painting represents 'The Risen Christ', depicted in the act of forgiving the penitent Mary Magdalene. 

The feast day of St. Mary Magdalene is celebrated on 22 July, or on the closest Sunday to this calendar date.

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